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Redacted Mueller Report Hard To Find at Department of Justice Website? We Got Your Report Right HERE!

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Redacted Mueller Report Hard To Find at Department of Justice Website - We Got Your Report Right HERE
Redacted Mueller Report Hard To Find at Department of Justice Website – We Got Your Report Right HERE

Marquette, Michigan – A number of people have commented that when they go to the U.S. Department of Justice website, it’s very hard to find the Redacted Muller Report released this Thursday.  And from the front page of the website, as displayed at 3 a.m. April 19th, it seems easy to find Attorney General William Barr’s Comments/Interpretation/Testimony about the report, but it was more difficult to find the actual redacted version of Mueller’s report.  Furthermore, once one finds the actual redacted Mueller Report, the document turns out to a scanned image, making searching text very difficult.

Here at the 8th Day Radio Show, we are big fans of the United State Constitution and our democratic republic.  We believe a well-informed electorate is a prerequisite to establishing and requisite to maintaining democracy.

We understand the experts on television and online can help with understanding complex and difficult topics, but final responsibility for defending our democracy lies with the people.  The people must remain vigilant to seek the truth of matters of public importance.

Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government.  — Thomas Jefferson

From the left though the right of the political spectrum, there has been a lot of representation and misrepresentation of what Special Council Robert Muller’s Report contains, with some confidently stating the exact opposite of what is contained therein while others bend and spin the facts to suit their own narratives and prejudices.
To address the complaints we’ve heard about finding source documents, below you will find some links select documents or links to pages of links the unedited (though sometimes redacted) documents.  Please understand, you should review actual original source documents first by verifying they are not edited or misrepresentations of the source documents.  Since links we put up today may be compromised by tomorrow, we suggest you download the actual original documents rather than relying on links to remain fresh or true.
While there are thousands of pages of legal filings/documents found among the links provided, even brief skimming of those documents show just how serious the threat remains of hostile foreign interference to disrupt the American political process and system.  As for questions about legal interpretation and obstruction of justice and corruption, the words within the linked indictments, pleadings, and warrants speak volumes.  Read the actual words, unfiltered; make your own conclusions.
Redacted Mueller Report:

Unverified Searchable Versions of the Redacted Mueller Report:

More Related Documents:

Special Counsel’s Office

https://www.justice.gov/sco

On May 17, 2017, Robert S. Mueller III was appointed by acting Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein to serve as Special Counsel by the order below.

The Department recognizes that these documents may not yet be in an accessible format. If you have a disability and the format of any material on the site interferes with your ability to access some information, please email the Department of Justice webmaster. To enable us to respond in a manner that will be of most help to you, please indicate the nature of the accessibility problem, your preferred format (electronic format (ASCII, etc.), standard print, large print, etc.), the web address of the requested material, and your full contact information, so we can reach you if questions arise while fulfilling your request.

Related Court Documents

U.S. v. Roger Jason Stone, Jr. (1:19-cr-18, District of Columbia)

Roger Jason Stone, Jr., 66, of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, was arrested in Fort Lauderdale on Jan. 25, 2019, following an indictment by a federal grand jury on Jan. 24, 2019, in the District of Columbia. The indictment, which was unsealed upon arrest, contains seven counts: one count of obstruction of an official proceeding, five counts of false statements, and one count of witness tampering.

 

U.S. v. Michael Cohen (1:18-cr-850, Southern District of New York)

Michael Cohen of New York, New York, pleaded guilty on Nov. 29, 2018, to making false statements to the U.S. Congress in violation of 18 U.S.C. 1001 (a)(2). Cohen was sentenced on December 12, 2018, to serve two months in prison and pay a $50,000 fine.

 

U.S. v. Paul J. Manafort, Jr. (1:17-cr-201, District of Columbia)

Paul J. Manafort, Jr., of Alexandria, Va., pleaded guilty on September 14, 2018, to a superseding criminal information filed today in the District of Columbia, which includes conspiracy against the United States (conspiracy to commit money laundering, tax fraud, failing to file Foreign Bank Account Reports and Violating the Foreign Agents Registration Act, and lying and misrepresenting to the Department of Justice) and conspiracy to obstruct justice (witness tampering). On March 13, 2019, Manafort was sentenced to serve 73 months in prison, with 30 months to run concurrent with his sentence in the Eastern District of Virginia.

 

U.S. v. Viktor Borisovich Netyksho, et al (1:18-cr-215, District of Columbia)

A federal grand jury in the District of Columbia returned an indictment on July 13, 2018, against 12 Russian nationals for their alleged roles in computer hacking conspiracies aimed at interfering in the 2016 U.S. elections. The indictment charges 11 of the defendants with conspiracy to commit computer crimes, eight counts of aggravated identity theft, and conspiracy to launder money. Two defendants are charged with a separate conspiracy to commit computer crimes.

 

U.S. v. Konstantin Kilimnik (1:17-cr-201, District of Columbia)

A federal grand jury in the District of Columbia returned a third superseding indictment on June 8, 2018, against Konstantin Kilimnik, of Moscow, Russia. Kilimnik is charged with conspiracy to obstruct justice and obstruction of justice.

 

U.S. v. Richard W. Gates III (1:17-cr-201, District of Columbia)

Richard W. Gates III of Richmond, Va., pleaded guilty on Feb. 23, 2018, to a superseding criminal information that includes: count one of the indictment, which charges conspiracy against the United States, in violation of 18 U.S.C. 371 (which includes conspiracy to violate 26 U.S.C. 7206(1), 31 U.S.C. 5312 and 5322(b), and 22 U.S.C. 612, 618(a)(1), and 618(a)(2)), and a charge of making false statements to the Special Counsel’s Office and FBI agents, in violation of 18 U.S.C. 1001.

 

U.S. v. Paul J. Manafort, Jr., and Richard W. Gates III (1:18-cr-83, Eastern District of Virginia)

Paul J. Manafort, Jr., of Alexandria, Va., and Richard W. Gates III, of Richmond, Va., were indicted by a federal grand jury on Feb. 22, 2018, in the Eastern District of Virginia. The indictment contains 32 counts: 16 counts related to false individual income tax returns, seven counts of failure to file reports of foreign bank and financial accounts, five counts of bank fraud conspiracy, and four counts of bank fraud. On March 1, 2018, the court granted a motion to dismiss without prejudice the charges against Gates, following his guilty plea in a related case in the District of Columbia (1:17-cr-201). On Aug. 21, 2018, a federal jury found Manafort guilty on eight counts: counts 1-5, subscribing to a false individual income tax return for tax years 2010-2014; count 12, failure to file reports of foreign bank and financial accounts for year 2012; count 25, bank fraud; and count 27, bank fraud. The court declared a mistrial on 10 counts (counts 11, 13-14, 24, 26, 28-32). As part of his plea agreement on Sept. 14, 2018, Manafort admitted his guilt of the remaining counts against him in this case. On March 7, 2019, Manafort was sentenced to 47 months in prison and ordered to pay a $50,000 fine.

 

U.S. v. Alex van der Zwaan (1:18-cr-31, District of Columbia)

Alex van der Zwaan, of London, pleaded guilty on Feb. 20, 2018, to making false statements to FBI agents, in violation of 18 U.S.C. 1001. Van der Zwaan was sentenced on April 3, 2018, to serve 30 days in prison and pay a $20,000 fine.

 

U.S. v. Internet Research Agency, et al (1:18-cr-32, District of Columbia)

A federal grand jury in the District of Columbia returned an indictment on Feb. 16, 2018, against 13 Russian nationals and three Russian entities accused of violating U.S. criminal laws in order to interfere with U.S. elections and political processes. The indictment charges all of the defendants with conspiracy to defraud the United States, three defendants with conspiracy to commit wire fraud and bank fraud, and five defendants with aggravated identity theft.

 

U.S. v. Richard Pinedo, et al (1:18-cr-24, District of Columbia)

Richard Pinedo, of Santa Paula, Calif., pleaded guilty on Feb. 12, 2018, to identity fraud, in violation of 18 U.S.C. 1028. On Oct. 10, 2018, Pinedo was sentenced to serve six months in prison, followed by six months of home confinement, and ordered to complete 100 hours of community service.

 

U.S. v. Michael T. Flynn (1:17-cr-232, District of Columbia)

Lieutenant General Michael T. Flynn (Ret.), of Alexandria, Va., pleaded guilty on Dec. 1, 2017, to making false statements to FBI agents, in violation of 18 U.S.C. 1001.

 

U.S. v. George Papadopoulos (1:17-cr-182, District of Columbia)

George Papadopoulos, of Chicago, Illinois, pleaded guilty on Oct. 5, 2017, to making false statements to FBI agents, in violation of 18 U.S.C. 1001. The case was unsealed on Oct. 30, 2017. On Sept. 7, 2018, Papadopoulos was sentenced to serve 14 days in prison, pay a $9,500 fine, and complete 200 hours of community service.

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